Trang chủ » Top 10+ most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal đầy đủ nhất

Top 10+ most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal đầy đủ nhất

Top 10+ most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal đầy đủ nhất

Bài viết sau đây sẽ cung cấp cho bạn đầy đủ kiến thức và nội dung về most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal mà bạn đang tìm kiếm do chính biên tập viên Làm Bài Tập biên soạn và tổng hợp. Ngoài ra, bạn có thể tìm thấy những chủ đề có liên quan khác trên trang web lambaitap.edu.vn của chúng tôi. Hy vọng bài viết này sẽ giúp ích cho bạn.

Introduction

When parents have a new baby, the first question they typically ask is whether they have a girl or a boy. Children’s gender assignment becomes a powerful social identity that shapes children’s lives. During early childhood, girls and boys spend much of their time in the home with their families and look to parents and older siblings for guidance. Parents provide children with their first lessons about gender. Possible ways that parents might influence children’s gender development include role modeling and encouraging different behaviours and activities in sons and daughters.1

Problems

One of the challenges for researchers studying parental socialization is to separate the influences of parents on children and the influences of children on parents.2 Fifty years ago, when researchers observed correlations between parenting practices and children’s behaviour the typical inference was that the parents were influencing the children. However, developmental psychologists now recognize that children also influence their parents’ behaviour. Thus, drawing conclusions about causal influences of parental socialization on children’s gender development must be made carefully.

Key Research Questions

When evaluating the influence of parents on children’s gender development, four questions are pertinent:

  • Do parents tend to have gender-stereotypical expectations for their children?
  • Do parents tend to model traditional gender-role behaviours to their children?
  • Do parents tend to encourage gender-stereotyped behaviours and to discourage cross-gender-stereotyped behaviours in their children?
  • Do gender-related variations in parents’ expectations and behaviour have causal influences on children’s gender development?

Xem thêm: Top 10+ chim có tổ người có tông đầy đủ nhất

Research Results

Parents’ gender-stereotypical expectations.

Gender-typed expectations may occur regarding personality traits (e.g., “boys are aggressive”), abilities (e.g., “girls are good at reading”), activities, and roles (e.g., “men are scientists”).3 As gender equality has increased in many many cultures during the last several decades, there has been a corresponding increase in adults’ endorsement of gender-egalitarian attitudes. There is now more variation among parents with some holding traditional expectations and some expressing egalitarian expectations for their daughters and sons.4,5 Also, some parents may support egalitarian views about some domains (e.g., occupations) but remain more traditional about other domains (e.g., family roles). Finally, parents (especially fathers) tend to be more rigid in their expectations for sons than daughters.6

Parents’ gender-role modeling.

One of the dramatic social changes in much of the industrialized world in the last 50 years has been in the entrance of women into the labor force. In contemporary industrialized societies, most women with children work outside of the home. Men’s average involvement in childcare and housework has also increased, although domestic responsibilities continue to be handled mostly by women in most dual-career families.6 Research finds that fathers’ childcare involvement is negatively related to children’s gender stereotyping. Through active involvement in childcare, fathers demonstrate that the adult male role may include nurturing as well as instrumental activities.7

The potential influence of parental gender-role modeling has also been implicated in studies of children raised by lesbian or gay parents.8 Compared to children raised in two-parent heterosexual families, children raised by same-gender parents tend be less likely than to endorse certain gender stereotypes. However, when same-gender parents divided labor with one parent as primary caregiver and the other parent as the primary breadwinner, their children were more likely to express stereotyped views about adult roles and occupations.8

Xem thêm: Top 15 cặp chất nào sau đây xảy ra phản ứng

Parents’ differential treatment of daughters and sons.

In many parts of the world, parents with limited financial resources have a strong preference for sons. As a result, priority for resource opportunities ranging from health care to education may be given to sons over daughters.9 This stark contrast in the differential treatment of sons and daughters is generally not seen in wealthier countries. Nonetheless, there are common ways that parents in these societies may socialize girls and boys differently.

According to one comprehensive review of studies conducted in western countries, the most consistent manner by which parents treat girls and boys differently is through the encouragement of gender-stereotyped activities.10 This includes the types of toys that parents might purchase or the kinds of activities that they promote. For example, parents are more likely to provide toy vehicles, action figures, and sports equipment for their sons; and they are more likely to give dolls, kitchen sets, and dress-up toys to their daughters. Once children begin to request particular toys (usually by around 3 years of age), it is unclear how much parents are shaping their children’s play activity preferences as opposed to acceding to their children’s stated preferences.11

There are also subtle ways that parents may reinforce gender stereotypes even when they are not overtly encouraging them. This is commonly seen in parents’ use of essentialist statements about gender. Examples would be “Girls like dolls” or “Boys like football.” In these instances, the parent is expressing what is known as a descriptive stereotype (i.e., describing general patterns or “essences” about each gender) rather than prescriptive stereotype (i.e., stating what should occur). Research suggests that even middle-class mothers who held gender-egalitarian attitudes often used essentialist statements with their preschool-age children. Also, they rarely challenged gender stereotypes (e.g., “It’s ok if a girl wants to play basketball”).12,13

On average, parents in many industrialized cultures are more flexible about the play activities they consider acceptable for daughters than sons.6,10 (Relatively little research has examined parental attitudes toward girls’ and boys’ play in non-western or non-industrialized countries.) Also, fathers tend to be more rigid than mothers in encouraging gender-typed play (especially in sons).6,10 For example, many American parents encourage athletic participation (a masculine-stereotyped activity) in their daughters. In contrast, few parents encourage doll play (a feminine-stereotyped activity) in their sons. Indeed, many parents are alarmed in such cases. However, evidence suggests that some parents are more tolerant of cross-gender-typed behaviours in sons than seen in earlier decades.4,14

Research Gaps

Xem thêm: Top 10 the water company will have to

More research is needed that addresses the extent and the manner by which parents influence their children’s gender development. Previous research has been largely based on correlational designs that do not prove causation. Some associations in behaviour between parents and their biological children may be due to shared genetic influences (e.g., activity level is partly inherited).2 Well-conducted longitudinal research is best able to address possible casual influences. The relative importance of parents compared to other socializing agents (peer groups, media, teachers, etc.) needs to be examined in more depth. In addition, more research needs to consider indirect forms of parental influence. For example, by encouraging children’s involvement in organized activities (e.g., sports teams, science camps), parents can affect their children’s experience outside of the family.15 Finally, we need a better understanding of how cultural contexts shape gender roles in the family and the socialization of girls and boys.16

Conclusions

Dramatic transformations in women’s and men’s roles inside and outside of the family have occurred during the last half century in most of the industrialized world. The traditional image of the two-parent heterosexual family with the father serving as the provider and the mother as the homemaker is no longer the norm in many industrialized countries. Instead, most mothers pursue jobs outside of the home and many fathers are involved in childcare. In addition, many children are raised by single parents and by lesbian/gay parents. Despite these role changes, there remain relatively few truly egalitarian parenting arrangements. Also, studies suggest that parents with gender-egalitarian attitudes may nonetheless act differently with daughters and sons.12 Longitudinal studies suggest that parents’ treatment of sons and daughters may have an influence on some aspects of their gender development.3,6

Implications for Parents, Service Providers, and Policy Makers

Parents, service providers, and policy makers may wish to foster more flexible gender roles in children to help them develop a broader repertoire of socioemotional and cognitive skills. Although parents can have an influence on children’s gender development, their impact can sometimes be overestimated. Because gender is a social category that organizes virtually every segment of society, there are multiple sources of socialization in children’s gender development. Besides parents, these potentially include other family members, peer groups, friends, the media, and teachers.11 As children get older and become more autonomous, the influences of peers and the media often become especially powerful.

Parents can try to encourage their children to play with a combination of feminine- and masculine-stereotyped toys and play activities during early childhood; however, they may find their efforts run counter to children’s attitudes once they are exposed to peers and the media. In addition, parents can be mindful of the kinds of peers with whom their children affiliate. They may be able to foster greater gender-role flexibility through encouragement of organized mixed-gender activities in which girls and boys learn to work together as equals. Finally, parents can make a concerted effort to discuss and challenge gender stereotypes with their children.

References

  1. Bussey K., Bandura A. Social cognitive theory of gender development and differentiation. Psychological Review. 1999;106:676-713.
  2. Collins WA, Maccoby EE, Steinberg L, Hetherington EM, Bornstein MH. Contemporary research on parenting: The case for nature and nurture. American Psychologist. 2000;55:218-232.
  3. Ruble DN, Martin CL, Berenbaum S. Gender development. In Damon W, Lerner RM. (series eds), Eisenberg N (vol. ed.). Handbook of child psychology. Vol. 3. Social, emotional, and personality development, 6th ed. New York, NY: Wiley; 2006:858-932.
  4. Blakemore JEO, Hill CA. The Child Gender Socialization Scale: A measure to compare traditional and feminist parents. Sex Roles. 2008;58:192-2007.
  5. Marks JL, Lam CB, McHale SM. Family patterns of gender role attitudes. Sex Roles. 2009;61:221-234.
  6. McHale SM, Crouter AC, Whiteman S. The family contexts of gender development in childhood and adolescence. Social Development. 2003;12:125-148.
  7. Deutsch FM, Servis LJ, Payne JD. Paternal participation in child care and its effects on children’s self-esteem and attitudes toward gendered roles. Journal of Family Issues. 2001;22:1000-1024.
  8. Fulcher M, Sutfin EL, Patterson CJ. Individual differences in gender development: Associations with parental sexual orientation, attitudes, and division of labor. Sex Roles. 2008;58:330-341.
  9. Rafferty Y. International dimensions of discrimination and violence against girls: A human rights perspective. Journal of International Women’s Studies. 2013;14:1-23.
  10. Lytton H, Romney DM. Parents’ differential socialization of boys and girls: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin. 1991;109:267-296.
  11. Leaper C, Bigler RS. Gender. In Underwood M, Rosen LH, eds. Social development: Relationships in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. New York: Guilford Press; 2011:289-315.
  12. Gelman SA, Taylor MG, Nguyen SP. The developmental course of gender differentiation. Monographs of the Society for Research in Children Development. 2004;69(1):vii-127.
  13. Friedman CK, Leaper C, Bigler RS. Do mothers’ gender-related attitudes or comments predict young children’s gender beliefs? Parenting: Science and Practice. 2007;7:357-366.
  14. Wood E, Desmarais S, Gugula S. The impact of parenting experience on gender stereotyped toy play of children. Sex Roles. 2002;47:39-49.
  15. Eccles JS, Barber BL, Stone M, Hunt J. Extracurricular activities and adolescent development. Journal of Social Issues. 2003;59:865-889.
  16. Best DL. Gender roles in childhood and adolescence. In Gielen UP, Roopnarine JL, eds. Childhood and adolescence in cross-cultural perspective. Westport, CT: Greenwood; 2004:199-228.

Mục lục

Top 17 most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal tổng hợp bởi Lambaitap.edu.vn

Growing up equal (reading comprehension) – O škole – Deti a my

  • Tác giả: oskole.detiamy.sk
  • Ngày đăng: 06/10/2022
  • Đánh giá: 4.63 (311 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public policy …
  • Khớp với kết quả tìm kiếm: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public policy and law. However, old-fashioned ideas and a lot of prejudice are still part of our …

Growing up equal.docx – GROWING UP EQUAL When we treat a

  • Tác giả: coursehero.com
  • Ngày đăng: 03/16/2022
  • Đánh giá: 4.48 (354 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: View Growing up equal.docx from ELL 401 at Qafqaz University, Baku. … end up believing us.1Most parents want their sons and daughtersto have equal chances …

We love our daughters. But we need a son

We love our daughters. But we need a son
  • Tác giả: blogs.worldbank.org
  • Ngày đăng: 03/31/2022
  • Đánh giá: 4.35 (314 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Armenia today has one of the most imbalanced sex ratios at birth in … Parents expect their sons to provide financial support and care in …
  • Khớp với kết quả tìm kiếm: This refrain captures the common sentiment in Armenia, and is at the heart of the growing issue of sex imbalances in the country. Armenia today has one of the most imbalanced sex ratios at birth in the world , with 114 baby boys born for every 100 …

Your Child is Not Your Equal: Why You Have to Be the Boss

  • Tác giả: empoweringparents.com
  • Ngày đăng: 01/26/2022
  • Đánh giá: 4.15 (251 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Many parents also want to be their child’s friend—they don’t like the idea of being the … They also supervise their children’s behavior and decide what’s …
  • Khớp với kết quả tìm kiếm: Many parents also want to be their child’s friend—they don’t like the idea of being the boss at all. The major problem with this approach is that a friend is non-judgmental, and a friend is a peer. In my opinion, your child’s role simply isn’t equal …

Xem thêm: Top 18 khí h2s không tác dụng với chất nào sau đây

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D to

  • Tác giả: giainhanh.vn
  • Ngày đăng: 03/05/2022
  • Đánh giá: 3.88 (476 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when · Gender stereotypes are rigid ideas about how boys and girls …

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the questions.         Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public policy and law. However, old-fashioned ideas and a lot of prejudice are still part of our culture and present challenging questions for parents.       Gender stereotypes are rigid ideas about how boys and girls should behave. We all know what these stereotypes are: A feminine girls should be insecure, accommodating and a little illogical in her thinking. A masculine boy should be strong, unemotional, aggressive, and competitive. How are children exposed to these stereotypes? According to the researchers David and Myra Sadker of the American University of Washington, D.C., boys and girls are often treated differently in the classroom. They found out that when boys speak, teachers usually offer constructive comments, when girls speech, teachers tend to focus on the behavior. Its more important how the girls act rather than what they say.       The emphasis on differences begins at birth and continues throughout childhood. For example, few people would give pink babys clothes to a boy or a blue blanket to a girl. Later, many of us give girls dolls and miniature kitchenware, while boys receive action figures and construction sets. Theres nothing wrong with that . The problem arises when certain activities are deemed appropriate for one sex but not the other. According to Heather J. Nicholson, Ph.D., director of the National Resource Center for Girls, Inc., this kind of practice prevents boys and girls from acquiring important skills for their future lives.        The fact is, says Nicholson, that society functions as a kind of sorting machine regarding gender. In a recent survey, fifty-eight percent of eighth-grade girls but only six percent of boys earned money caring for younger children. On the other hand, twenty-seven percent of boys but only three percent of girls earned money doing lawn work. If we are serious about educating a generation to be good workers and parents, we need to eliminate such stereotypes as those mentioned previously.       Gender stereotypes inevitably are passed to our children. However, by becoming aware of the messages our children receive, we can help them develop ways to overcome these incorrect ideas. To counteract these ideas, parents can look for ways to challenge and support their children, and to encourage confidence in ways that go beyond what societys fixed ideas about differences of sext are. (Source: https://en.islcollective.com) Which of the following could be the main idea of the passage?

  • Tác giả: vietjack.online
  • Ngày đăng: 05/22/2022
  • Đánh giá: 3.6 (377 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public …

(CÓ đáp án) đề MINH họa THEO cấu TRÚC của bộ GIÁO dục số 10

  • Tác giả: text.123docz.net
  • Ngày đăng: 10/03/2022
  • Đánh giá: 3.49 (233 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public …

Do parents treat their sons and daughters differently?

  • Tác giả: blog.innerdrive.co.uk
  • Ngày đăng: 02/08/2022
  • Đánh giá: 3.32 (494 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Underestimating Girls; Overestimating Boys. Recent research reveals that mothers of infants show a gender bias in favour of their sons. In one particular study, …

Xem thêm: Top 20+ dòng điện một chiều thì tần số bằng bao nhiêu chính xác nhất

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the questions from 36 to 42. Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public policy and law. However, old- fashioned ideas and a lot of prejudice are still part of our culture and present challenging questions for parents. Gender stereotypes are rigid ideas about how boys and girls should behave. We all know what these stereotypes are: A “feminine” girls should be insecure, accommodating and a little illogical   in her thinking. A “masculine” boy should be strong, unemotional, aggressive, and competitive.  How are children exposed to these stereotypes? According to the researchers David and Myra Sadker of the American University of Washington, D.C., boys and girls are often treated differently in the classroom. They found out that when boys speak, teachers usually offer constructive comments, when girls speech, teachers tend to focus on the behavior. It’s more important how the girls act rather than what they say. The emphasis on differences begins at birth and continues throughout childhood. For example, few people would give pink baby’s clothes to a boy or a blue blanket to a girl. Later, many of us give girls dolls and miniature kitchenware, while boys receive action figures and construction sets. There’s nothing wrong with that. The problem arises when certain activities are deemed appropriate for one sex but not the other. According to Heather J. Nicholson, Ph.D., director of the National Resource Center for Girls, Inc., this kind of practice prevents boys and girls from acquiring important skills for their future lives. “The fact is,” says Nicholson, “that society functions as a kind of sorting machine regarding gender. In a recent survey, fifty-eight percent of eighth-grade girls but only six percent of boys earned money caring for younger children. On the other hand, twenty-seven percent of boys but only three percent of girls earned money doing lawn work”. If we are serious about educating a generation to be good workers and parents, we need to eliminate such stereotypes as those mentioned previously. Gender stereotypes inevitably are passed to our children. However, by becoming aware of the messages our children receive, we can help them develop ways to overcome these incorrect ideas. To counteract these ideas, parents can look for ways to challenge and support their children, and to encourage confidence in ways that go beyond what society’s fixed ideas about differences of sext are What does the word “that” in paragraph 3 refer to?

  • Tác giả: hamchoi.vn
  • Ngày đăng: 06/29/2022
  • Đánh giá: 2.99 (268 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public …

Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal – Toploigiai

  • Tác giả: toploigiai.vn
  • Ngày đăng: 01/12/2022
  • Đánh giá: 2.93 (64 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public …

The result of a recent survey showed that the number of

  • Tác giả: zix.vn
  • Ngày đăng: 11/23/2021
  • Đánh giá: 2.8 (140 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely …

Đề số 5 – Hoc24

  • Tác giả: hoc24.vn
  • Ngày đăng: 03/09/2022
  • Đánh giá: 2.68 (141 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. … Gender stereotypes inevitably are passed to our children.
  • Khớp với kết quả tìm kiếm: Many young people are very aware of the pitfalls of the flexible workplace; they understand that redundancy, downsizing and freelancing are all part of modern working life, but no one is telling them how they might be able to turn the new rules of …

Xem thêm: Top 15 vở bài tập toán lớp 4 tập 2 bài 130

Đề luyện thi THPTQG năm 2020 môn Tiếng Anh (có đáp án chi tiết)

  • Tác giả: text.loga.vn
  • Ngày đăng: 11/28/2021
  • Đánh giá: 2.51 (61 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Question 5: It is impossible for him to be financially independent at such an early … Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of …
  • Khớp với kết quả tìm kiếm: “The fact is,” says Nicholson, “that society functions as a kind of sorting machine regarding gender. In a recent survey, fifty-eight percent of eighth-grade girls but only six percent of boys earned money caring for younger children. On the other …

Which of the following could be the main idea of the passage?

  • Tác giả: moon.vn
  • Ngày đăng: 04/19/2022
  • Đánh giá: 2.43 (81 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public …

Women’s Legal Service Victoria | CHILDREN & FAMILY LAW

  • Tác giả: womenslegal.org.au
  • Ngày đăng: 08/27/2022
  • Đánh giá: 2.38 (71 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Is that right? No. The law does not say that children must spend equal amounts of time with each parent after their parents …

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D to indicate the answer to each of the question. Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public policy and law. However, old-fashioned ideas and a lot of prejudice are still part of our culture and present challenging questions for parents. Gender stereotypes are rigid ideas about how boys and girls should behave. We all know what these stereotypes are: A “feminine” girls should be insecure, accommodating and a little illogical in her thinking. A “masculine” boy should be strong, unemotional, aggressive, and competitive. How are children exposed to these stereotypes? According to the researchers David and Myra Sadker of the American University of Washington, D.C., boys and girls are often treated differently in the classroom. They found out that when boys speak, teachers usually offer constructive comments, when girls speech, teachers tend to focus on the behavior. It’s more important how the girls act rather than what they say. The emphasis on differences begins at birth and continues throughout childhood. For example, few people would give pink baby’s clothes to a boy or a blue blanket to a girl. Later, many of us give girls dolls and miniature kitchenware, while boys receive action figures and construction sets. There’s nothing wrong with that. The problem arises when certain activities are deemed appropriate for one sex but not the other. According to Heather J. Nicholson, Ph.D., director of the National Resource Center for Girls, Inc., this kind of practice prevents boys and girls from acquiring important skills for their future lives. “The fact is,” says Nicholson, “that society functions as a kind of sorting machine regarding gender. In a recent survey, fifty-eight percent of eighth-grade girls but only six percent of boys earned money caring for younger children. On the other hand, twenty- seven percent of boys but only three percent of girls earned money doing lawn work”. If we are serious about educating a generation to be good workers and parents, we need to eliminate such stereotypes as those mentioned previously. Gender stereotypes inevitably are passed to our children. However, by becoming aware of the messages our children receive, we can help them develop ways to overcome these incorrect ideas. To counteract these ideas, parents can look for ways to challenge and support their children, and to encourage confidence in ways that go beyond what society’s fixed ideas about differences of sext are. The word “counteract” in the last paragraph could be best replaced by

  • Tác giả: qa.haylamdo.com
  • Ngày đăng: 05/14/2022
  • Đánh giá: 2.22 (90 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public …

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the correct answer to each of the questions.         Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely mandated by public policy and law. However, old-fashioned ideas and a lot of prejudice are still part of our culture and present challenging questions for parents.       Gender stereotypes are rigid ideas about how boys and girls should behave. We all know what these stereotypes are: A feminine girls should be insecure, accommodating and a little illogical in her thinking. A masculine boy should be strong, unemotional, aggressive, and competitive. How are children exposed to these stereotypes? According to the researchers David and Myra Sadker of the American University of Washington, D.C., boys and girls are often treated differently in the classroom. They found out that when boys speak, teachers usually offer constructive comments, when girls speech, teachers tend to focus on the behavior. Its more important how the girls act rather than what they say.       The emphasis on differences begins at birth and continues throughout childhood. For example, few people would give pink babys clothes to a boy or a blue blanket to a girl. Later, many of us give girls dolls and miniature kitchenware, while boys receive action figures and construction sets. Theres nothing wrong with that . The problem arises when certain activities are deemed appropriate for one sex but not the other. According to Heather J. Nicholson, Ph.D., director of the National Resource Center for Girls, Inc., this kind of practice prevents boys and girls from acquiring important skills for their future lives.        The fact is, says Nicholson, that society functions as a kind of sorting machine regarding gender. In a recent survey, fifty-eight percent of eighth-grade girls but only six percent of boys earned money caring for younger children. On the other hand, twenty-seven percent of boys but only three percent of girls earned money doing lawn work. If we are serious about educating a generation to be good workers and parents, we need to eliminate such stereotypes as those mentioned previously.       Gender stereotypes inevitably are passed to our children. However, by becoming aware of the messages our children receive, we can help them develop ways to overcome these incorrect ideas. To counteract these ideas, parents can look for ways to challenge and support their children, and to encourage confidence in ways that go beyond what societys fixed ideas about differences of sext are. (Source: https://en.islcollective.com) Which of the following could be the main idea of the passage?

  • Tác giả: khoahoc.vietjack.com
  • Ngày đăng: 02/09/2022
  • Đánh giá: 2.16 (86 vote)
  • Tóm tắt: Most parents want their sons and daughters to have equal chances of success when they grow up. Today, equality of the sexes is largely …
Xem thêm
Scroll to Top